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Blessed Peter To Rot
Blessed Peter To Rot
Blessed Peter To Rot
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Blessed Peter To Rot

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This digital art print of Blessed Basil Moreau is the perfect addition to your home decor or a great gift for birthdays, Confirmation, weddings, or Christmas.

Saint Details:

Blessed Peter To Rot (pronounced “toe rote”) was born in 1912 near New Britain, in Papua New Guinea. He was born to parents who were respected in the community; his father was a chief and local leader and together, his parents had six children.

Peter gained an education as a child, even though it was not required, and he was devout. He participated in the Mass and was a leader among his peers. When he was 18, he inquired about the possibility of becoming a priest, and though his father did not think it was time for one of their generation to become a priest, he did allow his son to become a catechist. 

After going away to Catechist School, Peter was eventually called back to his home parish when he was 21. Back home, he taught at the school and took care of the sick in his community and eventually he got married and began a family.

In 1942, the war reached Papua New Guinea. Japanese soldiers arrived and rounded up missionaries and sent them to a prison camp, which meant the local priest was sent away. Peter gladly took on the duties of the parish in his absence. Eventually, it became too dangerous to pray and worship in public, so Peter instructed the people of the parish to pray in secret caves. He also spoke out against the policy of taking a second wife, as it went against Church teaching. Somebody eventually reported Peter to the Japanese soldiers and he was arrested and jailed. To a village chief who came to visit him in prison, Peter said, “I am in prison because of the adulterers and because of the church services. Well, I am ready to die. But you must take care of the people.”

Peter’s wife brought him a rosary in prison and Peter told her it was his duty to die for his people and for the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Peter was killed, and though his death was made to look like an accident, his people knew what really happened. He was given a chief’s burial and he is revered as a martyr for his faith.